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Year : 2000  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 299

Carbamazepine and weight gain.






How to cite this article:
Ranganath H N. Carbamazepine and weight gain. Neurol India 2000;48:299


How to cite this URL:
Ranganath H N. Carbamazepine and weight gain. Neurol India [serial online] 2000 [cited 2019 Aug 17];48:299. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2000/48/3/299/1450



Carbamazepine is regarded as the best and the first choice of medication for many types of seizure disorders. This drug controls the seizures very effectively with least side effects. One of the side effects mentioned is weight gain. At least 15 cases of gross weight gain are reported by our patients of all ages from 15 to 25 kg, over a period of 2-5 years. The worst weight gainers are adolescents, both male and female, in the age group of 10-20 years. I have recorded gross weight gain in 15 patients in the last 5 years. The weight gain was not related to the dosage of medication or duration of treatment. An average dose of 600-1200 mg was used, depending on the clinical situation. Other causes of weight gain like over eating, lack of exercises, consumption of aerated drinks were excluded. The weight was successfully reduced by 8-10 kg by using acetazolamide which is also used in epilepsy in divided doses (8-30 mg/kg), without alterating seizure control or serum carbamazepine levels, in a period of 3-6 weeks. Thereafter, weight remained under control over 12 months.
Weight gain is a very serious problem for both girls and boys and very little stress is being made in the literature, hence I wish to bring it to our readers for their experience and comments.
 

 

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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow