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Year : 2000  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 330--2

Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression : experience in 40 patients.


Department of Neurosurgery, K.G. Hospital, Coimbatore, India., India

Correspondence Address:
M Natarajan
Department of Neurosurgery, K.G. Hospital, Coimbatore, India.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 11146595

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Forty patients of trigeminal neuralgia were treated with percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression. Symptoms had been present since six months to twenty years. The age ranged between 23 years and 73 years. All the patients had immediate relief from pain. Two had already undergone trigeminal cistern rhizolysis. One patient had foramen ovale stenosis. After the procedure, all the patients had mild to moderate degree of ipsilateral facial sensory loss which included buccal mucosa and anterior 2/3rd of the tongue. Facial dysaesthesia (anaesthesia dolorosa) was seen in only one case, who had mild involvement lasting one week. Thirty patients had altered taste sensation, probably due to general somatic sensory loss. Five patients had herpes perioralis. In this study group, two patients had already undergone microvascular decompression. All the patients were followed for a period ranging from one to eighteen months. Balloon compression technique seems to be better than injection of alcohol, glycerol or radio frequency lesion. Recurrence of pain was noted in 3 patients after one year.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow