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Year : 2002  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 539

Images : multiple meningiomas.


Department of Radiological Imaging, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi - 110 054, India.

Correspondence Address:
Department of Radiological Imaging, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi - 110 054, India.



How to cite this article:
Popli M B. Images : multiple meningiomas. Neurol India 2002;50:539


How to cite this URL:
Popli M B. Images : multiple meningiomas. Neurol India [serial online] 2002 [cited 2019 Aug 21];50:539. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2002/50/4/539/1311




A 27 years old female, presented with severe headache of one month's duration. X-ray skull lateral view showed localized hypeorstosis of the sphenoid bone and enlarged vascular channels of skull vault [Figure 1]. CT and MR showed multiple meningiomas in different neuro axial compartments [Figure 2] and [Figure 3]. Patient had no other sign or symptom of a neuro-cutaneous syndrome. There was no evidence of Von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis in either the patient or in other family members. There was no history of radiation beam therapy.
The underlying mechanism of multiple meningioma formation is unknown. It is thought that multiple meningiomas arise from uncontrolled spread of a single progenitor cell. Another hypothesis suggests that multiple separate meningiomas originate from multicentric neoplastic foci activated by a supposed 'tumor-producing factor.

 

 

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Online since 20th March '04
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