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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 51  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 379--382

Choroid plexus papilloma of the posterior third ventricle during infancy & childhood: Report of two cases with management morbidities


1 The National Neurosurgical Centre, Khoula Hospital, Post Box 90, Postal Code 116, Mina-Al-Fahal, Oman
2 Department of Pathology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman

Correspondence Address:
R R Sharma
P.O.Box 397, Postal Code 118, Al-Harthy Complex, Muscat
Oman
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 14652445

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We report two cases of posterior third ventricular choroid plexus papilloma, one in an 8-month-old infant and another in a two-year-old child. These cases presented with features of obstructive hydrocephalus. Both these patients underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt surgery prior to the tumor excision. Following the VP shunt surgery both patients developed ascitis requiring exteriorization of the abdominal end of the shunt. There was a clear proof of CSF overproduction: 1400-1500 ml/ day in the eight-month-old infant and 900-1200 ml / day in the two-year-old child. In the former it was transient and could be treated with revision of the VP shunt whereas in the second case a ventriculo-arterial shunt had to be done. In the second case a staged reduction cranioplasty was also performed for an enormously enlarged head (head circumference—74 cm). Interesting clinical and radiological findings and useful management strategies are described.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow