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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 59--63

Lift-up laminoplasty for myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine


Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan

Correspondence Address:
K Ohata
Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 15069240

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Background and Aims: We have utilized lift-up laminoplasty to treat patients with myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the cervical spine. The preliminary surgical outcome with computer-assisted morphological assessment is presented. Material and Methods: The surgical technique of lift-up laminoplasty includes standard posterior exposure of the cervical spine, en-bloc laminectomy, and expansion of the cervical canal by lift-up of the laminae with custom-designed hydroxyapatite laminar spacers and stabilization of the laminae using titanium miniplates. From 1998 to 2003, 10 consecutive patients with cervical myelopathy secondary to OPLL have been treated with this method and comprehensively evaluated. Care was taken to tailor the treatment to individual patients by using different sizes of spacers to adjust the degree of expansion depending on the amount of stenosis of the cervical spine. The degree of expansion of the cervical canal was altered by design, based on the preoperative imaging simulation. Results: Preliminary surgical outcome, evaluated at 6 months after surgery, revealed a significant improvement of neurological function. Image analysis revealed that the cervical canals were significantly expanded, with a mean reduction of 13.1% in the stenosis ratio. Lift-up laminoplasty was effective in the treatment of patients with myelopathy secondary to cervical OPLL, and the amount of expansion could be individually adjusted at the discretion of the surgeon. Conclusion: Although analysis with a larger population and a longer follow-up period needs to be undertaken, our method of lift-up laminoplasty appears to be a viable choice among standard posterior cervical approaches for cervical OPLL.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow