Atormac
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 3824  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed12197    
    Printed223    
    Emailed13    
    PDF Downloaded274    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 10    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 478--481

Scalp arteriovenous malformations


Department of Neurosurgery, Kasturba Medical College and Hospital, Manipal, India

Correspondence Address:
Satyanarayana N Shenoy
Department of Neurosurgery, Kasturba Medical College and Hospital, Manipal - 576 119, Udupi, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 15626838

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

AIMS: We discuss our experience with the surgical management of scalp vascular malformation and review the literature on the subject. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A prospective case-control study of eight patients with scalp vascular malformations admitted to our hospital between 1997 and 2002. METHODS AND MATERIALS: All the patients were investigated with selective internal and external carotid angiography. Depending upon the origin of feeding arteries, the scalp vascular malformations were classified into two categories: Group I: the primary scalp arteriovenous malformations and Group II: secondary venous dilatations. Six patients belonged to Group I and two patients were in Group II. RESULTS: Five patients belonging to Group I underwent successful excision of the arteriovenous malformation. There was no recurrence in this group. Of the two patients in Group II, one patient who had scalp vascular dilatation simulating a primary scalp vascular malformation underwent excision of the lesion. This patient developed severe postoperative brain edema and died. CONCLUSIONS: Primary scalp vascular malformation can be excised safely. However, excision of secondary scalp venous dilatation without treatment of the intracranial component can be dangerous.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow