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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 283--285

Cranial nerve involvement in patients with leprous neuropathy


Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Sudhir Kumar
Department of Neurological Sciences, Apollo Hospitals, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad - 500 033
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.27154

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Background: Leprosy is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy, perhaps closely matched by diabetic neuropathy. Patterns of peripheral neuropathy in leprosy can be varied, which may include mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex and symmetric polyneuropathy. Cranial nerves, especially facial and trigeminal nerves, are also commonly involved in leprosy. Aims: To find out the pattern and spectrum of cranial nerve involvement in a consecutive series of patients with leprous neuropathy. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of patients admitted with leprosy to the Neurology Department of a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: All consecutive patients admitted during an 8-year period (1995-2003) and diagnosed to have leprosy were included. They were clinically evaluated to determine the frequency and pattern of cranial nerve involvement. Results: About 18% (9/51) of the leprosy patients seen during that period had clinical evidence of cranial nerve involvement. Facial and trigeminal nerves were the most commonly affected (five and four patients respectively). Conclusions: Cranial nerve involvement is common in leprosy, which emphasizes the need to carefully examine them. Also, one should exclude leprosy in patients presenting with isolated cranial neuropathies.






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