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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 415--417

Global aphasia due to left thalamic hemorrhage


1 Department of Neurology, Cukurova University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey
2 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cukurova University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Filiz Koc
Department of Neurology, Cukurova University School of Medicine, Adana
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.28118

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Global aphasia is an acquired language disorder characterized by severe impairments in all modalities of language. The specific sites of injury commonly include Wernike's and Broca's areas and result from large strokes - particularly those involving the internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries. Rarely, deep subcortical lesions may cause global aphasia. We present three cases with global aphasia due to a more rare cause: left thalamic hemorrhage. Their common feature was the large size of the hemorrhage and its extension to the third ventricule. HMPAO-SPECT in one of the cases revealed ipsilateral subcortical, frontotemporal cortical and right frontal cortical hypoperfusion. Left thalamic hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of global aphasia.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow