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 TOPIC OF THE ISSUE: REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 585--591

Encephalitis in the clinical spectrum of dengue infection


Neuropathology Group, Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Aravinthan Varatharaj
Pembroke College, Oxford, OX1 1DW
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.68655

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Dengue viral infections are common worldwide. Clinical manifestations form a broad spectrum, and include uncomplicated dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. Encephalopathy has been well reported and has classically been thought to result from the multisystem derangement that occurs in severe dengue infection; with liver failure, shock, and coagulopathy causing cerebral insult. However, there is increasing evidence for dengue viral neurotropism, suggesting that, in a proportion of cases, there may be an element of direct viral encephalitis. Understanding the pathophysiology of dengue encephalopathy is crucial toward developing a more effective management strategy. This review provides an overview of the clinical spectrum of dengue infection, and examines evidence supporting the existence of dengue encephalitis.






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Online since 20th March '04
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