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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 758--760

Localization of pilomotor seizure demonstrated by electroencephalography /functional magnetic resonance imaging


1 Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Si Chuan University, Cheng du, Sichuan - 610 041, China
2 Perception-Motor Interaction Laboratory, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, ChengDu, 610054, China

Correspondence Address:
Dong Zhou
Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Si Chuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan - 610 041
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.72179

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We report the first case of a pilomotor seizure detected by electroencephalography /functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI). An adult woman presented with history of bouts of gooseflesh feeling and poilomotor activity in the left leg following viral encephalitis. 24-hour video-EEG and simultaneous EEG during fMRI revealed ictal discharges in the right parietal and temporal lobes. Associated blood oxygen level- dependent (BOLD) activations were found mainly in the right parietal region. The result represents a different generator of pilomotor seizure compared to prior reports. We suggests that the feeling of gooseflesh could be the core ictal symptom and a direct pathway from the sensory cortex to the lower autonomic system may exist bypassing the classic cerebral autonomic center.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow