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 BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 101--103

Short-course treatment in neurobrucellosis: A study in Iran


1 Persian Gulf Institute, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran
2 Namazi Hospital, University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3 Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Farhad Abbasi
Fateme-alzahra Hospital, Siraf St, Bushehr
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.76879

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Neurobrucellosis is a rare neurological complication of brucellosis. This report describes 19 patients of neurobrucellosis and they accounted for 8% of all cases of brucellosis admitted to Shiraz University Hospitals over a period of eight years. Headache, fever, fatigue, drowsiness and neck stiffness were the common clinical features. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis in 100%, elevated protein levels in 89% and low glucose level in 47% of the patients. All the patients improved with specific antibiotic treatment. Of the 19 patients, 10 (52.5%) patients received treatment for 8 to 28 weeks. Duration of antibiotic treatment was: 8-14 weeks in 8 (42%) patients; 24-28 weeks in 2 (10.5%) patients; 6 months in 7 (37%) patients; 12 months in 1 (5.3%) patient; and 18 months in 1 (5.3%) patient. Clinicians in endemic areas should consider the likelihood of neurobrucellosis in patients with unexplained neurological and psychiatric symptoms.






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