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 BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 424--428

Surgical treatment and results in growing skull fracture


Department of Neurosurgery, L.T.M.G. Hospital, Mumbai, India

Correspondence Address:
Batuk Diyora
Department of Neurosurgery, 2nd Floor, L.T.M.G. Hospital, Sion (W), Mumbai - 400 022
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.82762

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Growing skull fracture is a rare complication of skull fracture and remains almost undetected in the first few years of life. Here, we report a series of 11 patients with growing skull fracture treated at our institute over a period of five years and discuss their clinical features, radiological findings, and principles of management. Of the 11 patients, six were females and five males, with the age ranging between 9 months and 12 years (mean, 3 years). Progressive scalp swelling was the most common presenting feature. Other clinical features included generalised tonic clonic seizures, eyelid swelling, and proptosis. Computed tomography scan of the head defined the growing skull fracture in all 11 patients and detected the underlying parenchymal injury. Postoperatively, all patients had a complete resolution of the scalp swelling. Two patients had postoperative seizures and one had cerebrospinal fluid leak. Early recognition and surgical repair is essential to prevent the development of neurological complications and cranial asymmetry.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow