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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 597--600

Balo's concentric sclerosis involving bilateral thalami


1 Department of Radiodiagnosis, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U, India
2 Firoz Specialist Hospital, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Medical Imaging, Royal Children Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Farheen Badar
Department of Radiodiagnosis, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U, Medical Road, Aligarh - 202 002, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.84345

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Balo's concentric sclerosis (BCS) is a rare inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system, pathologically chracterized by alternate bands of demyelination and preserved myelin tissue. Before the era of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), most cases of BCS were diagnosed on postmortem examination. MRI allows for noninvasive diagnosis by demonstrating characteristic changes which closely parallels the histopathological features of BCS. We report a case of 26-year-old female with BCS involving bilateral thalami, with typical MRI appearance.






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Online since 20th March '04
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