Atormac
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 5002  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1948    
    Printed39    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded108    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 378--381

Comparative study of electrophysiological changes in snake bites


Department of Medicine, BJ Medical College and Sassoon General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Patwari Panduranga
Room No. 506, Resident Quarters, BJGMC and SGH, Pune - 411 001, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.158214

Rights and Permissions

Aims: To study and compare the electrophysiological changes in neuroparalytic or vasculotoxic snakebites. Materials and Methods: 40 patients who had a definite history of snakebite, either vasculotoxic or neuroparalytic, were selected. They were grouped as Group A, 20 patients having a neuroparalytic snakebite with definite envenomation at the time of admission, and Group B, 20 patients having a vasculotoxic snakebite with definite envenomation at the time of admission. All patients underwent a detailed clinical examination, all relevant investigations and nerve conduction studies according to protocol. Results: In this study, we noticed that the motor nerve conduction amplitude, conduction velocity and distal latency were within normal limits in both the groups. On RNS (repetitive nerve stimulation study) of facial and median nerves, a decremental response was seen in 13 (65%) patients in facial nerve and in 7 (35%) patients in median nerve in Group A; while, the same response was seen in 8 (40%) patients in facial nerve and 3 (15%) patients in median nerve in Group B. A post exercise decremental response was seen in 13 (65%) patients in median nerve and 16 (80%) patients in facial nerve in Group A; and, in 3 (15%) patients in median nerve and 8 (40%) patients in facial nerve in Group B. Conclusions: In our study, we noticed that the decremental response on RNS was not only present in neuroparalytic snake bite (post-synaptic neuromuscular blockade) but also in vasculotoxic snakebite [pre-synaptic neuromuscular blockade] (seen in Russel's viper).






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow