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NEUROIMAGE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 638

Magnetic resonance imaging of sciatic nerve crush injury


Departments of Neurology and Radiology, Neurocenter GSMN, Genolier Clinic, Genolier, Switzerland

Date of Web Publication4-Aug-2015

Correspondence Address:
Antonio Carota
Clinique de Genolier, Route du Muids 3, CP-100 1272 Genolier
Switzerland
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.162129

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How to cite this article:
Carota A, Mekideche A, Knoepfli AS. Magnetic resonance imaging of sciatic nerve crush injury. Neurol India 2015;63:638

How to cite this URL:
Carota A, Mekideche A, Knoepfli AS. Magnetic resonance imaging of sciatic nerve crush injury. Neurol India [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 15];63:638. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2015/63/4/638/162129


Owing to alcohol intoxication, a 29-year-old man remained lying in the same position for 48 h, consequently sustaining a crush injury. Upon medical examination 2 months following the event, the patient presented with pain in the right sciatic nerve territory with concurrent anterior tibial nerve-like paresis. His electroneuromyography (ENMG) revealed a sciatic nerve axonal neuropathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) neurography indicated an enlarged right sciatic nerve with a high T2 signal [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. These findings suggest that, following a crush injury, MRI neurography is a useful tool in confirming the diagnosis of axonal neuropathy. MRI changes are consistent with the possibility of a low axonal transport. [1],[2] One-year post-episode, the recovery was nearly complete.
Figure 1: Coronal plan 3 - dimension turbo spin - echo T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging neurography of the injured right sciatic nerve along the long head of the biceps femoris. Sciatic nerve reveals enlargement and a high signal (arrow). T2 - weighted neurography uses sequences with long echo times (>90 ms) and radiofrequency signal pulses (to suppress signals from adjacent vessels) and frequency - selective fat suppression

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Figure 2: Transverse plan turbo spin - echo T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging neurography of the injured right sciatic nerve (arrow) reveals enlargement and higher signal as compared to normal left sciatic nerve

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  References Top

1.
Enochs WS, Schaffer B, Bhide PG, Nossiff N, Papisov M, Bogdanov A Jr, et al. MR imaging of slow axonal transport in vivo. Exp Neurol 1993;123:235-42.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Cudlip SA, Howe FA, Griffiths JR, Bell BA. Magnetic resonance neurography of peripheral nerve following experimental crush injury, and correlation with functional deficit. J Neurosurg 2002;96:755-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


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