Atormac
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 753  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 Search
 
  
 Resource Links
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (368 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this Article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed952    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded40    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


 
Table of Contents    
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1008

Complete intracranial migration of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Rare complication of a common procedure


Department of Neurosurgery, Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Date of Web Publication20-Nov-2015

Correspondence Address:
Parthasarathi Datta
Department of Neurosurgery, Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.170087

Rights and Permissions



How to cite this article:
Datta P. Complete intracranial migration of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Rare complication of a common procedure. Neurol India 2015;63:1008

How to cite this URL:
Datta P. Complete intracranial migration of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Rare complication of a common procedure. Neurol India [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 14];63:1008. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2015/63/6/1008/170087


Sir,

I read the article "Complete intracranial migration of a ventriculo peritoneal shunt: Rare complication of a common procedure" published in Neurology India in January-February 2015/Vol-63/Issue 1. I appreciate that the ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt procedure is a simple operation but may have a wide range of complications. Complete intracranial migration of a VP shunt is definitely a very rare complication.

The authors have mentioned that 3 months after the placement of the VP shunt, the child had altered sensorium. The upper and lower ends of the shunt were re-explored, found to be functioning well, and left in situ. Further, the shunt catheter was not palpable anywhere across the chest wall. I could not understand this condition that, if the shunt catheter was not palpable anywhere across the chest wall, how was it possible that, on exploration, the upper and lower ends of the shunt were found to be functioning well.

I also appreciate your statement that for a dislodged VP shunt catheter in the ventricle, an endoscopic removal is an option. However, the adherent choroid plexus poses a problem. In this situation, one option is negotiating a very thin malleable endoscope through the ventricular end of the catheter and coagulating the choroid plexus entering through the pores of the ventricular catheter. I do not have personal experience of this thin endoscope but articles report that this maneuver is often successful.




 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
   
Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow