Atormac
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 950  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 Search
 
  
 Resource Links
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (661 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this Article
   References
   Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1168    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded28    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 


 
Table of Contents    
NEUROIMAGES
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1383-1384

Perilymph fistula of oval window presenting as otogenic dizziness


Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sree Balaji, Medical College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication11-Nov-2016

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Venkatraman Indiran
Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sree Balaji, Medical College and Hospital, Chromepet, Chennai - 600 044, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.193805

Rights and Permissions



How to cite this article:
Indiran V. Perilymph fistula of oval window presenting as otogenic dizziness. Neurol India 2016;64:1383-4

How to cite this URL:
Indiran V. Perilymph fistula of oval window presenting as otogenic dizziness. Neurol India [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Sep 20];64:1383-4. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2016/64/6/1383/193805


A 58-year-old female patient presented with left-sided hearing loss for 2 years, tinnitus for 6 months, and giddiness for 1 month. The patient had a history of ear surgery at 12 years of age, the details of which were not known. The fistula test, which records eye movements while pressurizing each ear canal with a small rubber bulb, produced only slight nystagmus. Audiometry showed sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone revealed a small bony defect in the region of left oval window, with extension of stapes foot plate into the left vestibule [[Figure 1], Video 1], prompting the diagnosis of a perilymph fistula. The patient was advised a trial of bed rest along with the prescription of 16 mg betahistine for 2 weeks. Perilymph fistula, an abnormal communication between perilymph space and middle ear, may be either congenital or acquired.[1] It is one of the causes of otogenic dizziness. The most common sites of the fistula are the oval window and round window. Other sites include the semicircular canals and the otic capsule. The acquired fistula may be iatrogenic, traumatic, or erosive. Trauma from head injury, flying and diving barotrauma, sneezing, coughing, and labour are the most common causes of perilymphatic fistula.[2] Symptoms may include vertigo, imbalance, tinnitus, hearing loss, nausea, and vomiting. Symptoms may worsen with coughing, sneezing, and with exertion and activity.[3] HRCT of the temporal bone is better at depicting the bony abnormalities than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Conservative treatment such as bed rest, betahistine, and mild sedatives may be attempted. The definitive treatment is the surgical placement of a graft to obliterate the fistula.[1],[2],[3]
Figure 1: High-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone (a and c) revealed normal appearance of the stapes at the oval window on the right side. (b and d) A small bony defect in the region of the oval window on the left side with extension of the foot plate of stapes across the bony defect into the left vestibule

Click here to view



Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Roman S, Bourliere-Najean B, Triglia JM. Congenital and acquired perilymph fistula: Review of the literature. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 1998;18(4 Suppl 59):28-32.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Jeremy Hornibrook. Perilymph fistula: Fifty years of controversy. ISRN Otolaryngol 2012;2012:281248.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Hain TC. Perilymph Fistula-tchain.com. http://www.tchain.com/otoneurology/disorders/unilat/fistula.html. [Last accessed on 10 Dec 15].  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
   
Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow