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 NI FEATURE: THE QUEST - COMMENTARY
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 439--443

Standardization of the technique of silicon injection of human cadaveric heads for opacification of cerebral vasculature in Indian conditions


1 Department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shashwat Mishra
Department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.227303

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A surgeon's understanding of the surgical anatomy can be greatly enhanced by the dissection of preserved cadaveric specimens. A reliable and inexpensive biological model for testing and standardization of dye injection concentrations is proposed utilizing the goat's head as a biological model. The first phase was concerned with standardization of the dye by titrating its concentration and injecting various amounts into cerebral vessels of a goat's head until an optimal concentration had been ascertained. In the second phase, this optimum concentration of the dye was injected into four human cadaveric heads following the same technique standardized using the goat's head. Upon dissecting the four cadaveric human heads which were injected with silicon dyes and preserved in 10% formalin, the vessels were all well-opacified and the brain was of near normal consistency and good for dissection, without showing any features of putrefaction. The goat model, having similar color, texture, and the handling as the cadaveric head, offers an opportunity to test indigenously manufactured polymerizing dyes in the future. This biological model, therefore, has the potential to considerably reduce the cost of cadaver preparation.






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