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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1045--1049

Epidemiology, clinical profile and role of rapid tests in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis in children (aged 1-59 months)


Department of Microbiology, Indira Gandhi Medical College and Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Divya Chauhan
Department of Microbiology, Indira Gandhi Medical College and Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.236972

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Objectives: To study the epidemiology, clinical profile, and the role of rapid tests in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children (1-59 months). Materials and Methods: A total of 250 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 187 blood samples received from clinically suspected cases of ABM were processed based on standard microbiological protocols. CSF samples were also subjected to antigen and nucleic acid detection. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Children were also evaluated for outcomes and were followed up until 6 months after discharge. Results: Eighty one cases were reported to be having clinically confirmed ABM, out of which group B Streptococcus was the most common pathogen detected in 49.3% (40) patients followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Hemophilus influenzae type b, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis ACYW135 in 23.4% (19), 7.4% (6), 6.1% (5), 6.1% (5), 6.1% (5), and in 1.2% (1) patients, respectively. Complications were observed in 54.3% of the children. A follow-up of 6 months after discharge was possible in 39.5% (32) patients among whom sequelae were recorded in 93.7% (30) patients. Conclusion: ABM remains a major cause of neurological sequelae worldwide. Although culture is the gold standard test for its detection, the investigation takes a longer time and the results are influenced by prior antimicrobial therapy. In such cases, rapid tests aid in the early diagnosis of ABM for instituting appropriate management.






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