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Table of Contents    
NEUROIMAGE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1203-1204

Electrocution-induced skull bone lysis


Department of Radiology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Date of Web Publication18-Jul-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Omair Ashraf Shah
Department of Radiology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Jammu and Kashmir
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.237002

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How to cite this article:
Shah OA, Wani H, Parry A, Shera F, Malik A, Sheikh W, Tariq Gojwari MD. Electrocution-induced skull bone lysis. Neurol India 2018;66:1203-4

How to cite this URL:
Shah OA, Wani H, Parry A, Shera F, Malik A, Sheikh W, Tariq Gojwari MD. Electrocution-induced skull bone lysis. Neurol India [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Aug 17];66:1203-4. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2018/66/4/1203/237002




Electrical injuries have become more common forms of traumatic injuries. They usually present with a unique pathophysiology and are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The four classes of electrical injuries include:[1] true electrical injuries, flash injuries, flame injuries, and lightning injuries. The clinical manifestations range from the presence of transient unpleasant sensations without apparent injury to massive tissue damage.[2]

We present an interesting image-based report of a young 25-year old male patient with electrocution-induced multiple punched-out skull bone lytic lesions that could have been easily mistaken with the lesions seen in metastases, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, or multiple myeloma [Figure 1]. There was a history of fall of a high-tension wire over the patient while he was walking on the road. The image showed skull bone lysis with destruction and multiple lytic lesions. The underlying brain parenchyma was surprisingly normal [Figure 2] and [Figure 3], indicating a mechanism of injury that had resulted in superficial damage only.
Figure 1: Surface shaded display image of skull showing multiple punched out lytic lesions and destruction of skull bones centrally

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Figure 2: Sagittal CECT scan showing normal brain parenchyma underlying bone destructive areas

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Figure 3: Coronal CECT scan showing bony destruction and lysis with no obvious underlying brain parenchymal injury

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Dega S, Gnaneswar SG, Rao PR, Ramani P, Krishna DM. Electrical burn injuries Some unusual clinical situations and management. Burns 2007;33:653-65.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Cooper MA. Electrical and lightning injuries. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1984;2:489-501.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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