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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 131--134

Lateralized hyperkinetic motor behavior


Department of Neurology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Balaji Krishnaiah
Department of Neurology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.226448

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Seizures are followed by a post-ictal period, which is characterized by usual slowing of brain activity. This case report describes a 68-year old woman who presented with right-sided rhythmic, non-voluntary, semi-purposeful motor behavior that started 2 days after an episode of generalized seizure. Her initial electroencephalogram (EEG) showed beta activity with no evidence of epileptiform discharges. Computed tomography scan showed hypodensity in the left parieto-occipital region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed restricted diffusion/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities in the left precentral and post-central gyrus. Unilateral compulsive motor behavior during the post-ictal state should be considered, and not confused with partial status epilepticus to avoid unnecessary treatment. Abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, which are reversible, can help with the diagnostic and therapeutic approach.






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Online since 20th March '04
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