Atormac
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 2579  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed149    
    Printed1    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded20    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 NI FEATURE: NORMATIVE DATA - ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 229--234

Construction of Indian human brain atlas


1 Center for Visual Information Technology, International Institute of Information Technology (IIIT), Hyderabad, Telangana, India
2 Center for Visual Information Technology, International Institute of Information Technology (IIIT), Hyderabad, Telangana; Probabilistic Vision Group, Centre for Intelligent Machines, Department of electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
3 Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jayanthi Sivaswamy
Center for Visual Information Technology, IIIT, Hyderabad, Telangana
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.253639

Rights and Permissions

Context: A brain magnetic resonanace imaging (MRI) atlas plays an important role in many neuroimage analysis tasks as it provides an atlas with a standard coordinate system which is needed for spatial normalization of a brain MRI. Ideally, this atlas should be as near to the average brain of the population being studied as possible. Aims: The aim of this study is to construct and validate the Indian brain MRI atlas of young Indian population and the corresponding structure probability maps. Settings and Design: This was a population-specific atlas generation and validation process. Materials and Methods: 100 young healthy adults (M/F = 50/50), aged 21–30 years, were recruited for the study. Three different 1.5-T scanners were used for image acquisition. The atlas and structure maps were created using nonrigid groupwise registration and label-transfer techniques. Comparison and Validation: The generated atlas was compared against other atlases to study the population-specific trends. Results: The atlas-based comparison indicated a signifi cant difference between the global size of Indian and Caucasian brains. This difference was noteworthy for all three global measures, namely, length, width, and height. Such a comparison with the Chinese and Korean brain templates indicate all 3 to be comparable in length but signifi cantly different (smaller) in terms of height and width. Conclusions: The findings confirm that there is significant difference in brain morphology between Indian, Chinese, and Caucasian populations.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow