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LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1162-1163

Unilateral Tongue Atrophy and Fasciculations in Medullary Hemorrhage


Department of Neurology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication10-Sep-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ravindra K Garg
Department of Neurology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow - 226 003, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.266264

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How to cite this article:
Kumar N, Garg RK, Pandey S, Singh AK, Malhotra HS, Rizvi I, Uniyal R. Unilateral Tongue Atrophy and Fasciculations in Medullary Hemorrhage. Neurol India 2019;67:1162-3

How to cite this URL:
Kumar N, Garg RK, Pandey S, Singh AK, Malhotra HS, Rizvi I, Uniyal R. Unilateral Tongue Atrophy and Fasciculations in Medullary Hemorrhage. Neurol India [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 12];67:1162-3. Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2019/67/4/1162/266264




A 55-year-old hypertensive man presented with complaints of difficulty in walking and slurring of speech. Two years back, he had an episode of acute headache followed by altered sensorium; he became conscious after 15 days but with residual gait ataxia. On examination, the patient had cerebellar ataxia and right-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations [Video 1]. An old computed tomography and a recent magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right medial medullary hemorrhage and late post-hemorrhagic changes, respectively [Figure 1]. Possibly, a delayed degeneration of hypoglossal nucleus produced tongue hemiatrophy and fasciculations. This patient represents an unusual cause, as the most common etiology for unilateral/isolated tongue atrophy is a neoplasm.[1],[2]
Figure 1: Computed tomography done 2 years ago shows right medial medullary hemorrhage (right), and a recent MRI (T2*-weighted gradient echo and FLAIR sequences; middle and left images) shows old right medullary hematoma

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form, the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Blondin NA, Huttner A, Baehring JM. Unilateral tongue atrophy and fasciculation. Arch Neurol 2011;68:1478-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chen YG, Dai MS, Ho CL, Huang TC. Isolated hypoglossal nerve paralysis. Am JMed 2014;127:926-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


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