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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 487--488

General Paresis of Insane: A Forgotten Entity


Department of Neurology, NEIGRIHMS, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Medical Sciences Shillong, Meghalaya, India (An Autonomous Institute, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India), India

Correspondence Address:
Shri Ram Sharma
NEIGRIHMS, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Shillong, Meghalaya
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.284383

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The manifestations of CNS syphilis are unfamiliar to a differential of patients with dementia to many physicians today as of the relative rarity of this condition. This is a classical case report of a patient with syphilis and dementia in a 55-year-old female. General paresis of insane is a progressive disease of the brain leading to mental and physical worsening. It is important to consider tertiary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of dementia. Conventional presentations of neurosyphilis such as tabes dorsalis and general paresis of insane are read in textbooks only and rarely encountered in clinical practice in the 21st century.






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