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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 684--687

Secondary Bacterial Infection of a Solitary Cysticercus Granuloma


1 Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Pathology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ari George Chacko
Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore - 632 004, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.288991

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The most common presenting form of neurocysticercosis in the Indian subcontinent is a solitary cysticercus granuloma (SCG). Patients with typical SCGs almost never require any form of surgical intervention. Herein, we report an extremely rare case of bacterial superinfection of a left frontal SCG in a 23-year-old female, resulting in severe perilesional edema and mass effect. The patient had to undergo an emergency left decompressive hemicraniectomy and excision of the infected granuloma. Serum enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) for cysticercal antibodies was positive and histopathological examination of the lesion revealed a cysticercus. The culture of the pus from within the lesion grew vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. for which she was treated with linezolid for 6 weeks. At 6 months follow-up, she had residual motor dysphasia, right homonymous hemianopia, and right hemiparesis but was steadily improving. Secondary bacterial infection of an SCG is very uncommon and can be devastating. A high index of suspicion is therefore required when there is disproportionate perilesional edema and mass effect.






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