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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1247--1253

Visual outcome in 2000 eyes following microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas: Protracted blindness should not be a deterrent

Pinaki Dutta1, Tenzin Gyurmey2, Reema Bansal3, Ashis Pathak4, Sivashanmugam Dhandapani2, Ashutosh Rai2, Anil Bhansali2, Kanchan Kumar Mukherjee2 
1 Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India
4 Department of Neurosurgery, Fortis Hospital, Mohali, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kanchan Kumar Mukherjee
Department of Neurosurgery, Room No. 7, 5th Floor, F Block, Nehru Hospital, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012, Punjab and Haryana
India

Objective: To study the visual outcome after surgery for pituitary adenomas with visual deficits. Materials and Methods: All patients with pituitary adenoma, who presented from 2003-2014 in a tertiary care institute, were included in the study. Surgical outcome was measured in terms of difference in visual acuity, visual fields and optic fundus parameters documented before surgery, immediate post-operatively and at the third, and twelfth months following surgery. Results: At the initial presentation, visual involvement was seen in 87.2% patients. One year after surgery, 93.2% patients having abnormal vision had improvement in visual acuity and visual fields; whereas visual parameters were static in 5.2%. Visual deterioration occurred only in 1.3% patients. Moreover, five-percent of those who did not even have perception of light at presentation experienced significant improvement in vision after surgery. The shorter the duration of visual symptoms, the more was the percentage of patients having faster recovery in the early postoperative period. Conclusion: Post-operative visual outcome was directly proportional to the pre-operative visual acuity. Though the visual outcome was good in the long run irrespective of the duration of symptoms, the speed of recovery was proportional to the duration of visual deficits. However, presence of long-standing visual symptoms should not deter us to subject the patient to surgery. Even patients who are completely visually impaired for years should be subjected to surgery as early as feasible.


How to cite this article:
Dutta P, Gyurmey T, Bansal R, Pathak A, Dhandapani S, Rai A, Bhansali A, Mukherjee KK. Visual outcome in 2000 eyes following microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas: Protracted blindness should not be a deterrent.Neurol India 2016;64:1247-1253


How to cite this URL:
Dutta P, Gyurmey T, Bansal R, Pathak A, Dhandapani S, Rai A, Bhansali A, Mukherjee KK. Visual outcome in 2000 eyes following microscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas: Protracted blindness should not be a deterrent. Neurol India [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Jun 16 ];64:1247-1253
Available from: http://www.neurologyindia.com/article.asp?issn=0028-3886;year=2016;volume=64;issue=6;spage=1247;epage=1253;aulast=Dutta;type=0