Atormac
brintellex
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 1308  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7343    
    Printed228    
    Emailed11    
    PDF Downloaded152    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal

 

 
Year : 2000  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 216--22

Ideal ward round making in neurosurgical practice.


Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India., India

Correspondence Address:
A Pathak
Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India.
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 11025623

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

The success of a perfect ward round lies in the role of the consultant leading the 'round making group' (RMG) as well as the hallmark of effective questioning and participation of each member. Twelve senior consultants with more than 10 years' experience in neurosurgical practice at three different university hospitals were observed during round making by a participant observer. Observations were made on the group climate of the RMG, the leadership pattern and language expressed by the clinician conducting the round and the effectiveness in his performance as a leader during clinical discussions. The group climate showed evidence of good productivity and flexibility with 92% and 75% consultants, pleasantness of climate was above average with only 50% (6/12) and poor objectivity with 42% (5/12) consultants. Forty two percent of the consultants were not always very well comprehensible, while only 50% (6/12) spoke exactly fitting the occasion. Only 33% (4/12) of the consultants used humour effectively, while 42% (5/12) spoke unnecessarily in between discussion and were poor in introducing the problems of patient to the round making group. Ward round making in neurosurgical practice needs a holistic approach with motivation, planning, leadership skills and structured curriculum to fulfill its objectives.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow