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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 51  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 428

Non-hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage: Some interesting observations


Department of Neurology Sanjay Gandhi PGIMS, Raebareli Road, Lucknow - 226014

Correspondence Address:
Department of Neurology Sanjay Gandhi PGIMS, Raebareli Road, Lucknow - 226014
[email protected]



How to cite this article:
Jha S, Jose M. Non-hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage: Some interesting observations . Neurol India 2003;51:428


How to cite this URL:
Jha S, Jose M. Non-hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage: Some interesting observations . Neurol India [serial online] 2003 [cited 2020 Dec 4];51:428. Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2003/51/3/428/1203


Sir,
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for approximately 10-15% of all strokes.[1],[2] ICH has been reported to be secondary to drugs (anticoagulants, thrombolytic agents, etc), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), tumors, bleeding diathesis and even secondary to exposure to cold weather.[3],[4]
There were 94 cases of ICH hospitalized between October and January (2001-2002), of these 14 (14.9%) were non-hypertensive bleeds. The different etiologies of these cases were as: 1 patient each of AVM bleed, bleed after thrombolysis and chronic hepatic disorder; there were 2 patients each of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and of anticoagulant-induced bleed; there were 4 cases of non-hypertensive basal ganglia bleed; in 3 cases of ICH the exact etiology could not be identified. The age of the non-hypertensive ICH group ranged from 22-65 years. Mortality in both (hypertensive and non­-hypertensive) was almost the same (30% and 28.6% respectively).
 

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1.Feldman E. Intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke 1991;22:684-91.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Caplan L. Intracerebral hemorrhage revisited. Neurology 1988;38:624-7.  Back to cited text no. 2  [PUBMED]  
3.Caplan LR, Neely S, Gorelick PB. Cold related cerebral hemorrhage. Arch Neurol 1984;41:227  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.George W, Petty Bijoy, K Khandheria, Jack P Whisnant. Predictors of cerebrovascular events and death among patients with valvular heart disease. Stroke 2000;31:2628-35.  Back to cited text no. 4    

 

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Online since 20th March '04
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