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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 206--209

Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy


1 Department of Anthropology, Panjab University, Chandigarh - 160014, India
2 Departments of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160012, India
3 Departments of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160012, India

Correspondence Address:
K Sharma
Department of Anthropology, Panjab University, Chandigarh - 160014
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 15269472

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The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5%) and symptomatic epileptics (32.5%) was significantly higher than controls (20%). The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.






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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow