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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 270-271

Authors' Reply


Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, C.N.Centre, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029, India

Correspondence Address:
Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, C.N.Centre, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029, India



How to cite this article:
Behari M, Srivastava A K, Sardana V, Prasad K. Authors' Reply. Neurol India 2004;52:270-1


How to cite this URL:
Behari M, Srivastava A K, Sardana V, Prasad K. Authors' Reply. Neurol India [serial online] 2004 [cited 2021 Apr 23];52:270-1. Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2004/52/2/270/11067


Sir,
We appreciate the comments and would like to clarify the issues raised:
1. History of dog bite: It is known that the most common cause of rabies is dog bite but in a small number rabies is caused by other animal bite as well. However, the dilemma arises in a patient bitten by dog and the question which arises is if the flaccid weakness is due to paralytic rabies or post antirabies vaccine polyradyculopathy.
2. Incubation period: Though the mean incubation period in paralytic rabies is 49 days. There are case in whom symptoms of paralytic rabies occurs earlier.
3. Sphincter disturbance and sensory symptoms if occur are helpful in diagnosing a case as paralytic rabies. However, it may not be present in early stages in most cases.
4. We agree that disease progression is rather rapid and downhill in paralytic rabies but is not useful at the time of presentation.
5. Abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging is observed in paralytic rabies and was emphasized in the report.
The point that we wished to raise were the difficulties encountered in such a situation especially in the first few days and tips to differentiate the two conditions.
 

 

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Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow