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 INDIAN PERSPECTIVE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 249--256

Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India


1 Department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Forensic Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Suri
Department of Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Neurosciences Center, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.136897

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Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns.






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Online since 20th March '04
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