Atormac
briv
Neurology India
menu-bar5 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus
  Users online: 3823  
 Home | Login 
About Editorial board Articlesmenu-bullet NSI Publicationsmenu-bullet Search Instructions Online Submission Subscribe Videos Etcetera Contact
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed476    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded7    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 CASE REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 69  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 497--499

Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis Presenting as Diffuse Corpus Callosum Lesions


Department of Neurology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, No. 324 JingWu Road, 250021 Jinan, Shandong, P.R. China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Xiaohui Liu
Department of Neurology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, No. 324 JingWu Road, 250021 Jinan, Shandong
P.R. China
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.314578

Rights and Permissions

Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) is a rare lymphoproliferative disease characterized by angiocentric and angiodestructive infiltrate. It primarily affects the lung and sometimes may also affect the central nervous system (CNS), skin, kidney, liver, etc., but the involvement of lymph nodes and/or bone marrow is extremely rare, and if present, other diagnoses are usually considered. Isolated CNS involvement is very rare, and its pathogenesis and biological behavior have been controversially discussed. Here, we report a 46-year-old man with diffuse and symmetrical corpus callosum involvement. The histopathological findings were in keeping with LYG. Since there was no evidence of involvement of other organs, he was diagnosed with primary CNS-LYG. He responded well to steroids and his symptoms improved significantly. We also conduct an English literature review to provide clues for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 20th March '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow