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NEUROIMAGE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 69  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1139

Left Is Not Right – Callosal Disconnection Syndrome


Department of Neurology, Govt. Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, India

Date of Submission04-Dec-2020
Date of Decision25-Dec-2020
Date of Acceptance01-Mar-2021
Date of Web Publication2-Sep-2021

Correspondence Address:
Jidhin Raj
Department of Neurology, Govt. Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0028-3886.325327

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How to cite this article:
Raj J, George J, Suresh N, Radhakrishnan A. Left Is Not Right – Callosal Disconnection Syndrome. Neurol India 2021;69:1139

How to cite this URL:
Raj J, George J, Suresh N, Radhakrishnan A. Left Is Not Right – Callosal Disconnection Syndrome. Neurol India [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Oct 26];69:1139. Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2021/69/4/1139/325327




  1. Forty-three-year-old hypertensive and diabetic lady presented with sequential weakness of both lower limbs (right followed by left) over a period of two days. She had involuntary groping behavior of her left hand and had difficulty releasing grip of her left hand. She had difficulty using her left hand for activities like holding a plate. On examination, she was found to have left ideomotor apraxia, left tactile anomia and impaired crossed replication of hand/finger postures [Video 1] , findings well described in corpus callosal lesions[1],[2],[3]
  2. MRI revealed acute infarct in the bilateral ACA territory involving the body of corpus callosum [Figure 1] and MR angiogram revealed diffuse narrowing of all intracerebral arteries [Figure 1].
Figure 1: (a) Diffusion weighted image showing acute infarcts in bilateral medial frontal and corpus callosum. (b) MRI T2 Sagittal image showing infarct in corpus callosum. (c) T2 FLAIR IMAGE showing corpus callosal involvement. (d) MR angiogram showing diffuse narrowing of all intracerebral arteries

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  References Top

1.
Graff-Radford NR, Welsh K, Godersky J. Callosal apraxia. Neurology 1987;37:100-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Leiguarda R, Starkstein S, Berthier M. Anterior callosal haemorrhage. A partial interhemispheric disconnection syndrome. Brain 1989;112(Pt 4):1019-37.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Satomi K, Goto K. [Analysis of cross-replication disturbance of hand postures in a patient with callosal lesions due to anterior cerebral artery occlusion]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku 1987;27:599-606.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


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