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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 271-

Authors' Reply

R Ashalatha, A Kishore, C Sarada, MD Nair 
 Consultant in Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum - 695011, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
R Ashalatha
Consultant in Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum - 695011, Kerala
India




How to cite this article:
Ashalatha R, Kishore A, Sarada C, Nair M D. Authors' Reply.Neurol India 2004;52:271-271


How to cite this URL:
Ashalatha R, Kishore A, Sarada C, Nair M D. Authors' Reply. Neurol India [serial online] 2004 [cited 2021 Jan 23 ];52:271-271
Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2004/52/2/271/11069


Full Text

Sir,

We Dr. Varkey for the interest in our case report on Satoyoshi syndrome[1]. We are aware of the very recent publication of Drost et al., of anti GAD antibodies in Satayoshi syndrome[2]. Interestingly, unlike our patient, the case reported by them did not have any of the typical features of Satayoshi syndrome such as short stature, bony deformities, glucose intolerance, jaw muscel spasms etc. which were reported by Satayoshi. But for the age of onset, the case could have easily been called stiff person syndrome, a condition where 65% patients could have antiGAD antibodies. We agree that if the test were positive in a more typical case such as ours, it would add more strength to the presumed autoimmune etiology of the condition as well as the suggestion of Drost et al., that Satayoshi syndrome and Stiff person syndrome could both be different clinical expressions of a spinal hyperexcitiatibily state in different age groups. We will pursue the same.

References

1Ashalatha R, Kishore A, Sarada C, Nair MD. Satayoshi syndrome. Neurol India 2004;52:94-5.
2Drost G, Verrips A, Hoojikaas H, Zwarts M. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in SAtayoshi syndrome. Ann Neurol 2004;55:450-1.