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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1373--1374

Ectasia of transverse and sigmoid sinuses with vein of Galen malformation

Pankaj Kumar, Vinayak Rastogi, Shaam Bodeliwala, Vikas Kumar, Hukum Singh, Daljit Singh 
 Department of Neurosurgery, G. B. Pant Institute of Postgraduate Education and Research (GIPMER), New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Pankaj Kumar
Department of Neurosurgery, G. B. Pant Institute of Postgraduate Education and Research (GIPMER), J.L.N. Marg, New Delhi - 110 002
India




How to cite this article:
Kumar P, Rastogi V, Bodeliwala S, Kumar V, Singh H, Singh D. Ectasia of transverse and sigmoid sinuses with vein of Galen malformation.Neurol India 2016;64:1373-1374


How to cite this URL:
Kumar P, Rastogi V, Bodeliwala S, Kumar V, Singh H, Singh D. Ectasia of transverse and sigmoid sinuses with vein of Galen malformation. Neurol India [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Mar 7 ];64:1373-1374
Available from: https://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2016/64/6/1373/193791


Full Text

A 12-year-old female patient presented with weakness of left side of the body since birth, headache for 2 years, and right eye proptosis with progressive diminution of vision and pain in the eye for 3 months.

True vein of Galen malformations (VGAM) are arteriovenous fistulas (AVF), supplied by a variety of arterial feeding vessels that drain into the aberrantly persistent fetal median prosencephalic vein of Markowski,[1] an embryonic precursor of the vein of Galen which usually regresses during the 11th week of gestation. By the third month of gestation, its posterior part joins the internal cerebral veins and basal veins to form the vein of Galen. In a VGAM, the arterial tributaries to the median prosencephalic vein persist, along with the median prosencephalic vein itself. Failure of the normal degeneration of the median prosencephalic vein and persistence of its primitive arteriovenous fistulous connections are the central events leading to the persistence of this vein instead of the vein of Galen,[2] sometimes along with persistent fetal falcine vein, an accessory straight sinus or an accessory torcula [Figure 1] and [Figure 2].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

Therapeutic options available for a VGAM include open surgery, endovascular treatment, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The transarterial approach is preferred and is more effective in controlling the symptoms of VGAM.[1],[2],[3]

The reported case was diagnosed as Type I, choroidal type according to the Lasjaunias classification. It had multiple feeding arteries entering from anterior aspect of the median prosencephalic vein.[1]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Lasjaunias PL, Chng SM, Sachet M, Alvarez H, Rodesch G, Garcia-Monaco R. The management of vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations. Neurosurgery 2006;59(Suppl 3):S184-94.
2Mortazavi MM, Griessenauer CJ, Foreman P, Bavarsad Shahripour R, Shoja M, Rozzelle CJ, et al. Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations: Critical analysis of the literature with proposal of a new classification system. J Neurosurg Pediatr 2013;12:293-306.
3Gupta AK, Rao VR, Varma DR, Kapilamoorthy TR, Kesavadas C, Krishnamoorthy T, et al. Evaluation, management, and long-term follow up of vein of Galen malformations. J Neurosurg 2006;105:26-33.