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Figure 1: The 6 Compression Points of the Greater Occipital Nerve. (1) The deepest, most proximal point is between the semispinalis and obliquus capitis inferior, close to the spinous process. (2) The entrance into the semispinalis capitis muscle. (3) The nerve's exit from the semispinalis capitis. (4) The entrance of the nerve into the trapezius muscle. (5) Where the nerve exits the trapezius fascia insertion into the nuchal line. Between points 4 and 5 there is continuous compression of the nerve by the trapezius fascia. (6) The occipital artery may also dynamically compress of the GON at four levels

Figure 1: The 6 Compression Points of the Greater Occipital Nerve. (1) The deepest, most proximal point is between the semispinalis and obliquus capitis inferior, close to the spinous process. (2) The entrance into the semispinalis capitis muscle. (3) The nerve's exit from the semispinalis capitis. (4) The entrance of the nerve into the trapezius muscle. (5) Where the nerve exits the trapezius fascia insertion into the nuchal line. Between points 4 and 5 there is continuous compression of the nerve by the trapezius fascia. (6) The occipital artery may also dynamically compress of the GON at four levels